Shares in publisher Trinity Mirror (LSE: TNI) have risen by up to 8% today after it released a reassuring trading update. It states that Trinity Mirror is on track to deliver on previous guidance for its interim results and it anticipates reporting strong cash generation over the period coupled with a further fall in net debt.

Trinity Mirror remains focused on delivering its strategy, particularly regarding its crucial digital goals. It also intends to take the necessary mitigating actions to support profitability given the increased uncertainty following the UK’s decision to leave the EU.

Despite this, Trinity Mirror continues to experience a highly challenging period. Group revenue dropped by 8% on a like-for-like (LFL) basis over the period, with a fall in print revenue being the cause of this. Gradually, Trinity Mirror’s financial performance should improve as it becomes less reliant on print and more focused on digital revenue, since the latter continues to offer double-digit growth in sales. And with a price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio of just 2.5, Trinity Mirror has a wide margin of safety and seems to be worth buying for long term investors.

China opportunity

Also in the news today is DJI Holdings (LSE: DJI). The provider of technology for the promotion and transaction of online bookings and mobile payments in China has announced a conditional placing to raise £29m through a number of major global institutional investors.

The placing strengthens DJI’s balance sheet and should allow it to pursue a number of major strategic opportunities that are currently under discussion. In turn this has the scope to develop significant new revenues and to create substantial shareholder value.

Looking ahead, DJI has considerable potential to benefit from China’s migration to mobile. It’s well-positioned within the world’s largest economy and evidence of this can be seen in DJI’s alliance with Xinhuatong, which was announced in April. This partnership positions DJI’s technology at the heart of a leading app for mobile payments and information. And due to other deals being possible over the medium term, DJI could be worth a closer look for less risk-averse investors seeking to diversify outside of the UK.

Currency boost

Meanwhile, GlaxoSmithKline (LSE: GSK) remains one of the best stocks to buy in a post-Brexit world. That’s because its performance is less positively correlated to the UK economy than is the case for most of its index peers, since GlaxoSmithKline operates on a global basis. Furthermore, it’s highly dependent on the progress of its pipeline, which is well-diversified and offers upbeat long-term sales growth potential.

Due to GlaxoSmithKline reporting in sterling and operating across the globe, a weaker currency is likely to be of benefit to its financial outlook. Therefore, following Brexit GlaxoSmithKline’s forecasts could be subject to modest upgrades, while its shares are likely to become increasingly popular due to their defensive characteristics. Trading on a P/E ratio of 18.2, GlaxoSmithKline is hardly dirt cheap. But given its defensive growth profile, it seems to be a top stock to own in a post-Brexit world.

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Peter Stephens owns shares of GlaxoSmithKline. The Motley Fool UK owns shares of and has recommended GlaxoSmithKline. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.