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Do I qualify for a boiler grant?

Do I qualify for a boiler grant?
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If you meet eligibility criteria, you could get financial help to repair or replace your current boiler. To find out if you qualify for a boiler grant, here’s what’s on offer.

What boiler grants are available?

Under the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) scheme, you could get a free or heavily subsidised boiler.

The ECO is a government scheme that aims to cut fuel poverty and increase energy efficiency in homes.

There are three promises that make up the ECO. One of them is the Affordable Warmth Obligation, and it’s this specific part of the ECO that could net you a free boiler.

Despite the ECO being a government initiative, it’s implemented by energy companies and specifically only by those considered to be medium or large suppliers.

Plus, although the Affordable Warmth Obligation might be casually referred to as a boiler grant, it’s actually not a grant in the true sense of the word. Instead of you being given money to install a new boiler, the energy company will assess your needs and fulfil those requirements as they see fit.

Will the scheme give me a free boiler?

That depends. As energy companies manage the scheme, what you get is up to them. Firms taking part also set their own terms to a certain extent.

For example, if you qualify for a boiler grant, Npower will provide a free replacement if your current one is broken or faulty. Other suppliers including E.ON and EDF will ask that you pay a certain amount towards a new boiler (currently capped at £395 and £240 respectively).

Bear in mind that the Affordable Warmth Obligation isn’t just about boilers. The scheme is there to help you save energy – which could include other improvements, like insulation.  

If you live in Wales, the Affordable Warmth Obligation is known as the Nest scheme.

Who qualifies for a boiler grant?

Boilers are expensive, as are upgrades to old, energy inefficient homes. So, as you can imagine, the eligibility criteria makes for a pretty long list.

In a nutshell, you could qualify for a boiler grant if you own your home or rent from a private landlord (you will, of course, need your landlord’s permission). You could also qualify if you live in private accommodation and receive certain benefits which include:

  • Universal Credit
  • Child Tax Credit
  • Child Benefit
  • Working Tax Credit
  • Income Support
  • Carer’s Allowance
  • Disability Living Allowance
  • Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Employment and Support Allowance
  • Personal Independence Payment

For a full list of qualifying benefits, head to gov.uk where you can find out more about the Energy Company Obligation.

Which energy suppliers offer boiler grants?

Each of the ‘big 6’ energy suppliers are part of the ECO scheme and subsequently the Affordable Warmth Obligation – they are:

  • British Gas
  • EDF
  • E.ON
  • Npower
  • Scottish Power
  • SSE (Scottish and Southern Energy)

Other well-known energy suppliers participating include:

  • Bulb
  • Ecotricity
  • Octopus Energy
  • OVO

For a full breakdown of who’s involved, see Ofgem’s list of ECO suppliers.

If I qualify, how do I apply for a boiler grant?

Your existing supplier should contact you if you qualify for a boiler grant (or other energy efficient improvements).

You can also apply directly to your energy supplier if you think you qualify but haven’t been contacted. You can usually do this online. Most suppliers will have a dedicated page that outlines the scheme, like these from E.ON and EDF.  

What other energy efficiency schemes are there?

If you don’t qualify for a free or subsidised boiler, take a look at the Green Homes Grant instead. You can also search for local schemes – simply enter your postcode on the Simple Energy Advice website.

Content Disclaimer: We have taken reasonable steps to ensure that any information provided is accurate at the time of publishing. The content provided in this article has not taken into account the circumstances of any specific individual, and does not constitute personal advice or a personal recommendation for any individual; neither should it be relied upon by any individual when making any decisions. If you require any personal advice or personal recommendation, please speak to an appropriate qualified adviser.

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Content Disclaimer: We have taken reasonable steps to ensure that any information provided is accurate at the time of publishing. The content provided in this article has not taken into account the circumstances of any specific individual, and does not constitute personal advice or a personal recommendation for any individual; neither should it be relied upon by any individual when making any decisions. If you require any personal advice or personal recommendation, please speak to an appropriate qualified adviser.

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