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8 online jobs for teens

8 online jobs for teens
Image source: Getty Images


If you are a teen looking to make money online or know someone who is, you’re in luck. The world of possibilities for flexible and potentially lucrative online work is ever-expanding. The following online jobs for teens are available year-round and can be performed from your bedroom (or your preferred lounging location). Many are open even to younger teens or don’t have any age requirements at all. In fact, your age can even be a selling point, as many companies and individuals are looking for youth perspectives and competencies unique to digital natives. 

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1. Teaching English

You might still be in school, but that doesn’t mean you can’t teach! As an English speaker, you have an incredibly desirable skill in the age of globalisation. Platforms like Cambly, SkimaTalk and SameSpeak offer a variety of options for one-on-one tutoring and group lessons and tend to pay quite well. You can become a SameSpeak coach at 16, but the others require you to be 18.

2. Freelancing

This is a pretty broad category, so let’s break it down. First, what you can do as a teenage digital freelancer: almost anything you can think of! Are you a Premier Pro or Photoshop whiz? You could edit videos or photos. Do you have a good command of language? You could write, edit or proofread text. Are you a fast typer? You could transcribe audio. Are you organised, numerate and professional? You could offer your services as a virtual bookkeeper or virtual assistant. Can you code? There’s tons of demand for both frontend and backend.

Now, where to go to find jobs: generalised sites like Fiverr and Upwork are great if you have a variety of talents or would like to communicate directly with clients. If you’d rather receive assignments, check out Mendr for photo editing, Textbroker and Constant Content for writing articles, FocusForward for transcription and Wordvice for editing and proofreading. Most of these platforms are available to anyone 13 or older.

3. Investing

If you’re 18 or older, you might consider online finance and investing apps. These have become popular with young users due to their free and easy-to-use services. They’re a great way to familiarise yourself with investing whilst potentially creating a passive income stream. However, it is important to be careful when dabbling in online investing because the simplicity of these apps makes it easy to get in over your head. 

Could you be rewarded for your everyday spending?

Rewards credit cards include schemes that reward you simply for using your credit card. When you spend money on a rewards card you could earn loyalty points, in-store vouchers airmiles, and more. MyWalletHero makes it easy for you to find a card that matches your spending habits so you can get the most value from your rewards.

4. Cryptocurrency

Online jobs for teens really run the gamut these days. In addition to investing, you could also consider trading Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. Unlike with investing, you can buy and sell Bitcoin as a minor. However, you should apply a similar level of caution when approaching cryptocurrency. 

5. Graphic design

If you’re at all artsy, consider uploading designs to sites like Bonfire, Canva, Cafe Press, Redbubble and Society6. Depending on the platform, your templates may be customised to products like t-shirts, cards, phone wallpapers and phone cases. The best part is that you’ll make money each time a product with your design sells! Age requirements range from 13 to 16.

6. Arts and crafts

As a non-digital creator, you can still make money by selling your art projects online. This is actually one of the more classic online jobs for teens. You can open an Etsy store at 18 by yourself or at any age with the assistance of a parent or guardian. 

7. Photography

Are you an amateur or aspiring photographer? Stock image sites like Shutterstock, iStock, and Dreamstime will pay you for royalties in exchange for photos. Other photo selling platforms include AGORA Images and Foap. You don’t even need fancy equipment; a good eye and a decent phone camera will do! You must be 18 to use these platforms, but you can also register through a parent or guardian.

8. Sell or resell clothes

Surely you have clothes in your closet you no longer wear. Why not sell them online via apps like Vinted and Depop? If you want to up your game, you could alter garments you thrift or make your online shop into a small business by building a curated collection. But this extra effort is not necessary; you can easily make money just by posting clothes you’ve outgrown or pieces you find at your local charity shop. However, you do need to be 18 to register as a seller with these apps.

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